The 7Ps that make a great marketing strategy

Back in the early 80s, when I was undertaking quite a bit of management training I became familiar with 7Ps. Proper Preparation & Planning Prevents Pretty Poor Performance*.

When I moved from IT Support Engineer and Consultant in to Internet Marketing I learned about a different 7Ps, the 7Ps of Marketing:

  • Product/Service
  • Price
  • Place
  • People
  • Process
  • Physical Evidence
  • Promotion


Sometimes, when I introduce myself as a marketing professional, some conclude that I work with “advertising”. As you’ll see as you read on, you’ll see that advertising is just one part of marketing communications, which is one of the 7 Ps of marketing.  

I’ve touched really briefly on the various elements of the marketing mix – but please get in touch if I can help you work through anything in particular, email andy@enterprise-oms.co.uk or give me a call on 01793 238020.

This is just a snapshot of the breakdown of marketing.  But it is good to sit back from your business and challenge yourself with some of these questions.

Product/Service: 

  • Is there a market for what you do? How do you know?
  • Why should people buy what you offer at all and why should they buy from you?
  • What makes you different from your competition?
  • Who is your competition – when did you last do a competitive SWOT?
  • What are the overall growth trends in your sector?
  • What is your sales pattern? What area of your sales is strongest and why and can you harness this strength elsewhere?
  • And what area is weakest? What are you doing about it?
  • How well do you treat your customers?
  • Which profitable customers can you win from whom? Who? How? Why? Where? When?

Price

  • Have you built value into your pricing?
  • Are you competitive?
  • Is your cost enough for you to work with profit?
  • How do you set your price?
  • Will you discount?
  • How will you avoid being always known for discounting?
  • What do your competitors do?
  • Keep It simple

Place

  • How easy/convenient is it for your customers to buy from you?
  • Where and how are you currently selling your products and services?
  • What are the opportunities to extend these?

If you are selling a service on the web, are you supporting with testimonials and case studies?

People

  • Are your people one of your main strengths of your business?
  • Or are you the bottle neck in your company? Are you better than everyone else and does everything have to come through you first?
  • What type of leader are you?
  • What is the path for your team to voice their concerns other than coming through you?
  • Are your people your best ambassadors or are they whinging about you/the business as soon as they are out of the door?
  • Are they as well trained as they can possibly be?
  • Did you involve your team when you last undertook a company SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) –really powerful.

Process

One of the vital Ps but often overlooked and often designed for the company’s benefit rather than the customer’s. Ask yourself:

  • Can your team deliver a consistent level of service to all customers and at all times?
  • Customer retention is critical.. how failsafe is your process to ensure you don’t lose any?
  • How effective is your sales process?
  • What processes have you in place for telephone answering/billing/communication with your clients/recommendations/operations/

Physical Evidence (Brand)

Your brand is defined as

  • Signs by which you are known and remembered
  • A bundle of explicit/implicit promises
  • A reflection of personality
  • A statement of position.

Have you thought about/discussed what does your company stand for? What’s its personality and philosophy? What’s your one key brand promise to your customers?

Your brand is so much more than your logo.  Think about a new visitor’s journey to your web site – does this reflect the look and feel of any communication they have had from you hitherto?  Will they recognise this as being part of the same business?  Have you had your website made mobile friendly?  Really important.

A few hours spent on this are far from fluffy nonsense. 

Promotion (Communication)

Just a few from the hundreds of options

  • Off line
    • Face to face
    • Word of Mouth referral
    • Networking
    • Telesales as part of a process
    • PR
    • Exhibitions and events
    • Direct marketing and sales letters with appropriate follow up driving to the web
    • Postcards
    • Events and seminars
    • Advertising but think carefully before you embark here. One off random ads are a waste of time and money! Is it the right target market?  Don’t be dazzled by offers…

On line

  • Website and how are you pushing your web? Does your copy talk about ‘you’, ie the reader?  Are you  making regular blog posts and updates?  Have you considered more SEO, more PPC,  back links, etc
  • Online videos on YouTube – how to/ about/testimonials – so many options.
  • Social media – which platforms should you invest time in?
  • Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest advertising.
  • Email news and updates

So then, back to the management version:
Just think how powerful your marketing strategy will be when you combine the planning from my original 7Ps with the focus provided by the 7Ps of marketing.

Combining your marketing knowledge to create a good strategy/plan using the 7Ps of Marketing coupled with the the 7Ps of Management managing implementation will surely lead to improved business performance.

But there are few quick wins when it comes to marketing, the more you work at it, the better it becomes. So, remember to take time away from working IN your business, (doing the business stuff) to work ON your business, doing the stuff that makes your business better. Set aside time on a weekly basis – little and often on a regular basis.

Remember though, I’m an Internet Marketing specialist although I’ll be more than happy to talk over other elements of your marketing activities and help where I can, Digital Marketing is where my skill set lies. If you have any questions, call me on 01793 238020, email andy@enterprise-oms.co.uk or just search Chief SEO Officer

*Oh, and of course we didn’t learn “pretty poor performance” we used a far more pithy term than “pretty”

New Year – New Security Resolution

Tamara EcclestoneIn December last year Tamara Ecclestone’s London home was burgled and jewellery worth £50m was stolen.

Leaving aside the fact that this is a phenomenal sum of money to have invested in jewellery only to leave it “lying around” there are many rumours as to the particular timing of the heist.

Just a few hours before the robbery took place, Tamara and her husband shared a picture on Instagram of them boarding a private jet.

As a billionairess it’s no doubt that people of a dubious background will have been watching her social media updates hoping for just such an opportunity. They will have lists of targets, important addresses and social media accounts and probably even have plans in place, ready for execution as soon as an opportunity presents itself.

So, think about the pictures you post to Social Media. What do they give away? All those photos of you sunning yourself on a beach somewhere warm and exotic tells near do wells that you are not at home. Photos of road trips tell people that you are not at home, or in your business.

You even need to make sure that there’s nothing in the background of the picture that can be zoomed in to that might give away something you’d rather kept private. An innocent looking photo taken outside of your house could, if zoomed in, give away your house number whilst previous, or subsequent pictures could give away your street name – for example.

If you are going away, and you are an important cog in your business, it could encourage scammers to target employees with fake emails requesting money transfers, payment of fake bills and invoices etc.

log on boxSo why not make 2020 the year you strengthen your security fortifications. Make a start with passwords and email.

  • Conduct a password audit of everything AND everybody involved in your business.
  • Enforce the use of strong passwords and encourage the use of password managers
  • Make sure that you have a strong email policy in place.
  • Educate yourself and your employees on the tricks used by scammers-
    • how to check whether a link in an email takes the clicker to a safe site or not
      Hint – hover your cursor over the link to see the full web address
    • Ensure that the email comes from a trusted address. Is it from mycompany.co.uk or mycompany.co or myc0mpany.co.uk for example?
      hint – hover your cursor over the address or just hit “reply”
    • Are there any obvious spelling or grammatical errors?
    • Would you be expecting an email from this particular source?
    • Does the email express an urgent response?

Don’t forget that people new to your organisation should also receive the same level of training. Always remember that “if it feels to good to be true” then it probably is

And if you are still unsure, look up the phone number for the company that you think the email is from and give them a call – don’t rely on the phone number that’s displayed within the potential scam email.

Watch out for more emails looking at security issues and if you have any concerns, please don’t hesitate to get in touch for an informal chat by email (andy@enterprise-oms.co.uk) by phone (01793 238020) or ask me on Social Media – Linkedin or Twitter and I’ll be only too happy to talk.

Thanks for reading and I hope you have a great, and secure 2020.

 

 

How to Use Twitter Lists

Twiter logo heading up a post about Twitter lists

Twitter’s great isn’t it? Really good for keeping in touch with your Followers, for keeping up with the latest news, raising awareness of your business, demonstrating that you know your stuff and acting as the starting point for conversations that could lead to business.

But……….if you’re following more than 100 people it can become quite a challenge to find Tweets from people that are of particular interest due to the speed your Twitter news-feed fills up with new Tweets.

But there is a solution that makes things so much easier – and it’s called Twitter Lists

What is a Twitter List

Simply put, Twitter Lists are like filters. You add people you follow (and you can add people you don’t follow too – more on that in a bit) and when you only want to see their Tweets, you simply choose the relevant list and all the Twitter noise from everyone else is immediately filtered out, just leaving you with updates from people on your lists.

Types of Lists

There are two types of list, public and private. A Public List is one that all Twitter uses can see and a Private List can only be accessed by yourself.The types of lists that you could have include

  • Current Clients,
  • Previous Clients,
  • Suppliers,
  • Prospects,
  • Affiliates,
  • Partners,
  • Influencers,
  • Local Community,
  • Friends,
  • Family,
  • Topics of Interest,
  • TV Shows

If these were my lists then I’d set the business related to “Private” so that my competitors can’t easily see who my clients are etc.

Now, when I want to interact with my clients to see what they’ve said, and to add my own thoughts/comments all I have to do is click on the relevant list and the rest of the Twittersphere goes away.

Making your First Twitter List

Create a new Twitter list

There are two ways to make a list. The first is to navigate to the drop-down menu you get by clicking on your image or avatar at the top right of your screen and selecting the “Lists” option. If this is your first list you’ll be presented with a “Create a List” option.

Give the list a name and write a brief description (if you want to add a description). Then you choose whether to make the list Public or Private and click “Save List”

Now Twitter will show you a box which will enable you to add people to your list. Conduct a search and when you come across someone you want to add you simply click on the three dots and choose the “Add to list” option and you’ll be shown all of your lists and you can choose which list or lists that you would like this person added too.

Adding People to your list from your news-feeds

When you are reading tweets and come across someone that you’d like to add to one of your lists, all you need to do is click on their Twitter name to go to their profile and click on the three dots menu by the “Follow/Following” button and use the “Add or remove from lists” option

How do I see what people on my lists are sharing?

All you have to do is head back to the drop-down menu that you get from clicking on your image/avatar and select “Lists”. You’ll be presented with all of your lists and you just click the list you want to see.

See, it’s easy and a really useful way to manage your Twitter followers

Shadow Lists

When you follow someone they receive a notification that you have followed them and so they might follow you back and you might not want them to know that you are keeping an eye on them. So don’t follow them, just add them to a list, and make it a Private list

Look at other Twitter users LIsts

Andy Poulton's Twitter feed

If you look at someone’s profile you’ll be able to see how many they have simply by clicking on “Lists” – you can see that I have 33 lists and if you click on any one of them you’ll see an option to “Subscribe” in the top left – click this and you’ll be Following the list and you’ll also be able to see all the members of the list.

What’s Next

Go away, set up some lists for yourself, add some people and have a bit of a play to get the hang of the way they work. You can thank me for saving you lots of time later.

Joking aside, if you do need any help with Twitter, Social or SEO just give me a call on 01793 238020, email andy@enterprise-oms.co.uk or share your question with me on Twitter or LinkedIn and I’ll be delighted to assist.

How ready is your business for marketing online?

I recently read a post on www.SmallBusinessNewz.com that says many small businesses do nothing to enhance their on-line presence and 90% have not even considered paid web marketing such as Pay per Click [aka Google Ads, PPC] or sponsored updates on Social Media sites.

£20 notesPersonally, I think that this is good news even though I may disagree with the one of the main reasons they give – they believe that it may be too expensive and not deliver results.

I know that a properly constructed and managed campaign WILL most certainly deliver results and does not have to be expensive. However, campaigns that are rushed in to place and ineffectively managed will simply feed the money hungry machines that are Google, Facebook etc.

What’s even worse is that even a well set up and managed campaign may not deliver the wished for results because the website at the end of the click may not be up to the task.

It would be like advertising the opening of a new supermarket, building demand and expectation and then throwing open the doors only to have the shelves half stocked and no one around to help or take your money. A wasted opportunity! Not only a wasted opportunity but a wasted future because people who have had their expectations dashed will never return and (and this is just as bad) spread the word.

So, a business with a website that is unsatisfactory from a visitors perspective should NOT embark on any new marketing activity until

  • the destination website is up to scratch.
  • they are sure they have the resources to deal with an uplift in enquiries and / or sales

What do I mean by having a website that is “up to scratch”? Watch this space for my next post.

Social Media – then and Now

I joined LinkedIn in 2005 when it had fewerThumbs up for social media than 1m members and really started paying attention to Social Media, from a business perspective, in 2008. It all started quite slowly, and then, like a snowball rolling down a hill, gathered speed and increased size and penetration at an increasingly rapid rate.

Earlier this week I came across some stats that compared Social media in 2010 to the state of play today and it makes for really interesting reading.

Twitter 2010

  • 75m user accounts, …of which only around 15m were active users
  • 27m Tweets per day [average]

Twitter 2013

  • 883m user accounts and 232m monthly active users.
  • 500m Tweets per day [average]

LinkedIn 2010

  • 50m members worldwide.

LinkedIn 2013

  • 259m members after increasing its user base by 40% in a year.

Facebook 2010

  • 350m monthly active users.
  • 50% of active users logged into Facebook each day, 175m per day
  • 65m users accessed Facebook through mobile devices.
  • 3.5Bn pieces of content shared each week

Facebook 2013

  • 1.19bn monthly active users.
  • 61% of users log on every day, that’s 727m active daily users
  • 874m monthly active mobile users
  • 33.25bn pieces of content links, news, blogs, etc.) shared every week.

Wikipedia 2010

  • 14m articles and 85,000 contributors.

Wikipedia 2013

  • 30m articles in 287 languages and 125,900 active registered users.

So what does this mean to the typical small business?

Simply that Social Media of all forms is here to stay and if you haven’t incorporated Social Media activity in to your marketing plan you really need to because you’ll probably find that your competition are there ahead of you!

Just make sure that you know which of the Social Media sites that you should be using  -ask your existing customers which ones they use and use this as your guide – you could always conduct a simple survey using www.surveymonkey.com

If you are unsure how to proceed, or want some help making your Social Media activity more focused and effective then please get in touch and we’ll explore the way ahead. Call me on 01793 238020 or drop an email to andy@enterprise-oms.co.uk